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Tag: Iron on appliques

Iron-on appliques can attach decorative patches to fabric by using heat and pressure. You can use them to add a unique touch to garments, and other liturgical fabric items. It offers creative possibilities with a variety of designs available.

Liturgical settings such as churches and religious schools find iron-on appliques particularly useful. Liturgical garments like robes, vestments, and stoles can benefit from these appliques as they enhance their appearance. Religious symbols and motifs often feature on these appliques, making them a perfect addition to religious ceremonies and events. Appliques are a practical and cost-effective way to decorate liturgical garments while creating beauty in religious settings due to their easy application process and durability.

Goldwork Dove applique for hand embroidery, Goldwork embroidery, Pentecost Dove, Ecclesiastical Sewing

Quick Sewing Tip: Add Goldwork Dove Appliques to Red Stoles for Pentecost

To create a vibrant Pentecost stole, start with a red stole, such as the Ely Crown Stole, featuring plain fabric near the chest area. Choose a gold Dove Applique, like the goldwork Dove with imitation Japanese Goldwork threads, which may include colored thread accents. For couching, use Goldwork threads like Imitation Japanese Gold Thread, Gilt gold twist, or Au Ver a Soie Gold Thread.

Pentecost Dove Emblem

Pentecost Dove Emblem

This little dove is a hand-embroidered applique that is ready to be applied to a vestment or altar hanging. The Dove is made from an assortment of goldwork threads such as bullion, passing thread, and purl pearl. The feet and nimbus rays are made from embroidered threads. This little dove is heavily padded to create a high relief.¬† The size is 4.5″ x 7″ which is a bit wide for a stole, but perfect for use in a quatrefoil frame for use on a chasuble or used on an altar hanging.

Urn pall for funerals

In Remembrance: Urn Palls for use at Funerals

The tradition within the church is to use a Pall to cover the coffin for funerals. At the time of Pugin (early to mid-1800s), Palls were elaborate items, often embellished with extensive embroidery and gold work. Palls are still used today to cover a coffin during a funeral service. They are frequently white in color with a cross or other appropriate design applied. While churches may own a Pall for covering a coffin, they may not have a pall for covering an urn. The use of urns to replace large coffins is becoming more common.

Fairford Violet Liturgical Brocade

Lent and Advent Pastor or Priest Stoles and Rose Stole for Laetare Sunday

Ecclesiastical Sewing introduces new designs in the Pastor or Priest Stole Collection for Lent and Advent. The Pope Gregory Violet Silk Dupioni Priest Stole, designed with gold trim and cross detail, is a featured stole. Available in various versions, with orphrey bands and tassels. Additionally, the Rose Stole, designed for Laetare and Gaudete Sundays, adds a special to the Penitential Seasons. The St. Ambrose Pastor or Priest Stole in rich violet hues. These stoles offer bespoke quality at an affordable price.

Sewing a Chalice Veil: Construction Details

To test a pattern for a Chalice Veil at Ecclesiastical Sewing, red silk dupioni was used for the face fabric, satin for the lining, and Evesham brocade for the orphrey band, trimmed with Saint Benet trim. The process involved measuring, cutting, and adding the orphrey band and trim. Basting the trim before sewing helped ensure it stayed straight. After completing the orphrey band, it was stitched to the silk, a cross was applied with an iron, and the lining was hand-stitched. The final result is a beautiful Chalice Veil in the Saint Gregory Collection of Vestments.

Nearing the end of the upper sky on the Angus Dei Ecclesiastical Embroidery Project

Large Agnus Dei Update

In the Agnus Dei Ecclesiastical Embroidery Project, significant progress has been made on the upper sky. Using long-laid stitches and horizontal guide marks, the detailed stitching maintains parallel and straight alignment. Frequent thread changes are necessary due to the 6 1/2″ stitch width, but the process speeds up as intricate details around the cross are left behind. The joy of completing a major portion of the sky-laid work is evident, with two-thirds now finished.

Goldwork threads ready for plunging on IHS Ecclesiastical Embroidery Design

IHS Ecclesiastical Embroidery A Little Progress

Working on the IHS Ecclesiastical Embroidery with gold threads is exciting. The sparkle and shine bring joy, but dealing with the cross ends is a bit tricky. Inspired by a vintage banner, branching gold threads from the center and facing challenges with plunging through three fabric layers. Considering adjustment for the better results. Happy stitching dreams!