Linen is Here

Today’s news is a quick update about Linen. It is here! And oh so lovely.  It makes me want to open the remaining packaging and get started on that linen ecclesiastical sewing project right now.

There is a nice variety of linens that arrived, all of which are suitable for use in making altar linens. The variety includes various weights from a cambric weight, suitable for those who want a light sheer linen for use in making veils for the altar, to a very fine linen that is oh so lovely for fine needlework. Another linen is intended for use in making  the traditional linen alb, for which I will be creating a pattern soon.  Others have the perfect size yarn which is ideal for hemstitching. Not enough variety, you say? How about some variety in widths: starting at 54 in widths, there is a 60 inch,  71 inch , and even a 120 inch wide linen.

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But that is not the only package with linen to arrive today. The other package of linen contains something very old, but still very lovely.  The photos of this gem will have to wait until a new larger slant board is ready for photography.

 

Solo Dei Gloria

Be sure to visit our online store front Ecclesiastical Sewing where you may shop for Liturgical Fabrics, altar linen fabrics, church vestment making patterns, liturgical machine embroidery designschurch vestment trims and notions and so much more. You may also find us on  Ecclesiastical Sewing  on Facebook , Twitter, and Pinterest. Sing up for our mailing list  at the bottom of the page on our online store front and receive a free copy of our Small Linens Booklet as our way of saying thank you for following along.

2 Comments »

  1. Who better direct this question to. I am consideraing making complete sets of everything needed for each season in liturgical garments as well as all the altar appointments. I have previously made chasubles, stoles and all the rest but I was a child of 40. Now 20 years later I am considering doing this again. I can well afford to buy sets for Lent, Advent, Christmas,
    Easter, Pentecost and Trinity(or the ordinary times). I would like to make them not to save
    money but for the satisfaction of doing something for the church I love. I will also have a team from the Altar Guild to help cut and all of that.
    Any advice for a 60 year old lady?
    Thanks Corey

    Like

    • Hi Corey,
      When I wanted to get back into making vestment after a 20 year lapse – chasubles, stoles, altar hangings and the like, I spent hours studying a several good books and hours looking at photos and vestment catalogs. Favorites on Flickr The books helped solidify ideas on working through technical issues. The photos helped with design ideas.

      It might be helpful to make one sample item of something for you are unfamiliar with the construction process – for example, an altar frontal or a pulpit fall. I use natural canvas as the interfacing (interlining) in all of stoles and altar hangings. The canvas provides the needed stability and firmness to ensure proper hanging. The other unknown trick is the canvas is inside the piece, and never extends into the seam allowance.

      But the best advice might be to give yourself the chance to learn. If something does not turn out quite right the first time, give it a good going over. Critic what works, what looks good, what did not work and why, and think through options for improvement, always striving for that next level of skill. These skills take time to learn. Years ago, someone would be an apprentice for a period of years, and work their way up in skills. It would take many more years to work to the level of mastery. So have patience with yourself, and share what you learn with others who are interested in learning.

      Best of luck as you embark on a wonderful work, using your skills for the Lord’s House. Keep us posted on your progress! I will try to add a few posts over the time which include links to previous posts on the topic.

      Please keep checking back of the next few months. There are many church vestment patterns and instruction guides in the works.

      Best regards,
      Carrie

      Like

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