Silver Stars for Advent Stole: Part 2

There are a few pastoral stole projects that need to be created in a relatively short period of time. The first stole is a Blue Advent stole. Blue is an alternate liturgical color frequently used by many churches for the season of Advent. The other liturgical color used during Advent is Purple. Since my church has used blue in the past, we will stick with the traditional color selection, and work on the goal of  a new vestment set.  I started a set last year, but was delayed by work, and it looks like work and a family wedding might derail the plans for completing a blue Advent set yet again. While the altar hangings might be in danger of becoming a UFO (unfinished object) with a pending holiday wedding in the family, an Advent stole is a “must” for this year.

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The design motifs for the Advent stole are a simple star worked in Cloth of Silver. This simple design would be great worked with an embroidery patch and heat press system. Lacking such technical advances, the stars will have to be completed with the “old-fashioned modern technique” of fusible web and machine applique.  If there were enough time, the designs could be tacked in place and outlines with various silver threads such as those in the above photo. But time does not allow for that luxury at the moment. So machine applique, here we come.

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The pattern has notches for placement of a design or an orphrey for use on the chest. These would need adjusting for someone who is either on the slim side, or the more petite size.  The placement is in the area where a lapel pocket would be on a suit jacket, or a logo on a polo type shirt for an approximate placement.  Keep in mind, that a stole worn by someone of slender build needs the motifs placed up a little further than does someone of a heavier build.  These are general ideas for men’s stoles. Ladies stoles are best left for  an additional conversation with regards to design and motif placement.  While this may not quite make sense, Keep this in mind, and in future posts, we can continue to explore this concept and show the differences to see what is pleasing and what is displeasing visually to the eye.

The above photo shows a ruler positioned on the fabric at the bottom placement line for the chest motif placement. I like to have both halves of the stole placed  evenly, side by side on the cutting or pressing surface. Once the bottom position is even on both stole halves, the stars are centered, and ironed into position.

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The stars are outlined with a satin stitch, and detail stitches are added in the centers.  A few additional stitching lines may be added to create the rays which “shine on the place where the Christ Child lays.

Now, I admit, this is a rather simple design, and there are many more options available. But sometimes, if a church or group is on an extremely tight budget, this is a great alternative method for creating a lovely stole that fits within a modest budget.

So. How about you? What methods do you like for use in creating stole designs? Let’s hear your ideas.

Solo Dei Gloria

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