Red Pentecost Stoles

Three Red Pentecost Stoles are finished!  What a joy to have Ecclesiastical Sewing projects complete and out of the workroom. Today we will take a look at one of the three stoles made for an installation, and talk about some things to look for prior to making a stole. Within the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod, Pastors wear red stoles whenever there is an installation service. These same red stoles can also double as a stole to be worn for Pentecost.

Red Pentecost Stole Construction
Red Pentecost Stole Construction

This stole is intended for use during an installation. The components consist of an applique of a Sword and Bible. The machine embroidered applique and the lower orphrey were placed on a silk dupioni stole using a red and gold galloon trim to finish of the raw edges.  While the red of the applique is a slightly darker color than the red of the stole, the gold trim bridges the color gap, and the colors blend together nicely, creating a subtle gradation.

The Stole has a second orphrey placed in the upper chest area to give it more color and to add a cross motif to the upper part of the stole. Without the Red orphrey at the top of the stole, things tend to look a little on the plain side.  The stole should never be thought of as boring!

Finished Red Pentecost Stole
Finished Red Pentecost Stole

It is fun to make stoles for Pastors and Priests, and on occasion surprise them with a gift. But my usual habit is to let them know I am making the gift.  Unfortunately, in this circumstance, that was not possible. So the stole was made, and given, and it looked great. The one difficulty encountered is that the Pastor wearing this stole is tall! The length on this stole is about 56″ finished, not including the tassels. This stole looked a little on the short side . An extra inch, or better yet, an extra 2 inches would be better when using this stole with a chasuble.

So how does one ensure a stole is the correct length?

4-5-inch-pastoral-stole-end-details

The 4 1/2″ Pastoral Stole which is available at the Ecclesiastical Sewing Storefront has three different stole length adjustments. It is a great idea to make a stole in the longest length, and make lines for the additional lengths. This stole can become a “fit” stole to check lengths for a new client.  The fit stole would be made without any trims, fringe or tassels.

Check the length and width of the stole on the intended wearer. Does the individual need a longer or shorter stole? Should the stole be slightly narrower? With the a stole available as a fit sample, all of these details can be worked through prior to making a final stole.

Installation of Kevin Robson CMO St. Louis, MO
Installation of Kevin Robson CMO St. Louis, MO

While stoles can be a little on the picky side, working through the Teaching Stole Kit helps one get through the “bugs” of the stole making process, and get on with the fun of creativity, while providing a great stole to use as a fit sample. A stole fit sample will come in handy if you get hooked on making stoles.

Here is the final result of one of the Three Red Pentecost Stoles as it was used for an installation service last week in St. Louis, MO.

Soli Deo Gloria

Be sure to visit our online store front Ecclesiastical Sewing where you may shop for Liturgical Fabrics, altar linen fabrics, church vestment making patterns, liturgical machine embroidery designschurch vestment trims and notions and so much more. You may also find us on  Ecclesiastical Sewing  on Facebook , Twitter, and Pinterest. Sing up for our mailing list  at the bottom of the page on our online store front and receive a free copy of our Small Linens Booklet as our way of saying thank you for following along.

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